In Camp

Group portrait Hovland Civilian Conservation Corps camp, Hovland, Minnesota.jpeg

Group portrait Hovland Civilian Conservation Corps camp, Hovland, Minnesota

CCC camps were constructed within 25 miles of worksites. In northern Minnesota, CCC enrollees arrived at a forest clearing or field along with boxes of supplies and canvas tents. After setting up their temporary shelters, they began building permanent structures for the camp, including the barracks, mess hall and kitchen, latrines and bath houses, and a recreation hall. Because men were sent to northern Minnesota beginning in the late summer and fall of 1933, barracks and other buildings needed to be constructed quickly before winter arrived.

%22Cookies%22 and other Civilian Conservation Corps men pose in front of building at the Gunflint camp, north of Grand Marais, Minnesota.jpeg

"Cookies" and other Civilian Conservation Corps men pose in front of building at the Gunflint camp, north of Grand Marais, Minnesota

In Hard Work and a Good Deal: The Civilian Conservation Corps in Minnesota, Barbara W. Sommer (2008) describes the typical schedule of life in camp. Days began with roll-call and flag-raising followed by breakfast. During the week, the men would leave for their conservation work projects after breakfast. They had free time in the afternoon before dinner. On the weekends, the men had to clean the camp, do vehicle and equipment maintenance, and other jobs in camp.

Inside the library at the Hovland Civilian Conservation Corps camp, Hovland, Minnesota.jpeg

Inside the library at the Hovland Civilian Conservation Corps camp, Hovland, Minnesota

During their freetime, enrollees could read books and newspapers in the camp library, play sports or music, or go hiking, fishing, swimming, or skiing. Occasionally CCC camps screened movies and organized dances.

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In Camp