Landscape

Entrance archway for Civilian Conservation Corps Camp 718, Cook County, Minnesota.jpg

Entrance archway for Civilian Conservation Corps Camp 718, Cook County, Minnesota

The CCC had a significant impact on Minnesota’s natural landscapes. In northern Minnesota, Superior National Forest and Chippewa National Forest grew thanks to the CCC’s work. New state forests were established, and existing ones were expanded and rehabilitated.

Unidentified fire tower, Minnesota.jpg

Unidentified fire tower, Minnesota

The CCC also worked to preserve these forests through fire fighting and forest prevention. In Hard Work and a Good Deal, Sommers (2008) notes that in Minnesota, “enrollees spent 283,000 man-days fighting forest fires and over 225,000 more on fire suppression and prevention, such as fire tower duty. They built 149 fire lookout towers and support buildings and 795 other buildings and structures” (p. 128).

Wayside at Cascade River State Park constructed by the Spruce Creek Civilian Conservation Corps crew, Lutsen, Minnesota.jpg

Wayside at Cascade River State Park constructed by the Spruce Creek Civilian Conservation Corps crew, Lutsen, Minnesota

The CCC also developed Minnesota’s state parks along the North Shore, including Cascade, Gooseberry Falls, and Jay Cooke, among others. Visitors to Minnesota state parks tripled during the CCC era, from 1935 to 1942, as many sought to take advantage of the new facilities and resources built by CCC enrollees. CCC projects in northern Minnesota forests and parks still shape the landscape we see there today. 

View each photo from their location below.

Landscape